How to learn successfully?

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Hello foreigner students, term has started. School, schoolmates, flatmates and the women in the shop on the conner aren’t so strange. This is the right time to learn some Czech words.

It isn’t so hard as you think.
Read carefully these tips and learning will be fun.


1. KNOW WHY YOU’RE DOING IT
This might sound obvious, but if you don’t have a good reason to learn a language, you are less likely to stay motivated over the long-run.. No matter your reason, once you’ve decided on a language, it’s crucial to commit:
“OK, I want to learn this and I’m therefore going to do as much as I can in this language, with this language and for this language.”


2. FIND A PARTNER
Learning and staying still motovated in pair or in group is easier. Donť worry, find a partner is an easy way.


3. TALK TO YOURSELF
When you have no one else to speak to, there’s nothing wrong with talking to yourself:
“It might sound really weird, but actually speaking to yourself in a language is a great way to practice if you’re not able to use it all the time.”
This can keep new words and phrases fresh in your mind and build up your confidence for the next time you speak with someone.


4. KEEP IT RELEVANT
If you make conversation a goal from the beginning, you are less likely to get lost in textbooks. Talking to people will keep the learning process relevant to you. Try to speak everywher you are.


5. ACT LIKE A CHILD
„This is not to say you should throw a tantrum or get food in your hair when you go out to a restaurant, but try learning the way kids do.“ The idea that children are inherently better learners than adults is proving to be a myth. The key to learning as quickly as a child may be to simply take on certain childlike attitudes: for instance, lack of self-consciousness, a desire to play in the language and willingness to make mistakes. We learn by making mistakes. As kids, we are expected to make mistakes, but as adults mistakes become taboo.


7. LEAVE YOUR COMFORT ZONE
Willingness to make mistakes means being ready to put yourself in potentially embarrassing situations. This can be scary, but it’s the only way to develop and improve. No matter how much you learn, you won’t ever speak a language without putting yourself out there: talk to strangers in the language, ask for directions, order food, try to tell a joke. The more often you do this, the bigger your comfort zone becomes and the more at ease you can be in new situations:
“At the beginning you’re going to encounter difficulties: maybe the pronunciation, maybe the grammar, the syntax, or you don’t really get the sayings. But I think the most important thing is to always develop this feel. Every native speaker has a feel for his or her own language, and that’s basically what makes a native-speaker – whether you can make the language your own.”


8. LISTEN
You must learn to listen before you can speak. Every language sounds strange the first time you hear it, but the more you expose yourself to it the more familiar it becomes, and the easier it is to speak it properly.


9. WATCH PEOPLE TALK
Different languages make different demands on your tongue, lips and throat. Pronunciation is just as much physical as it is mental. If you can’t watch and imitate a native-speaker in person, watching foreign-language films and TV is a good substitute.

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